Utah Marriage

Utah marriage laws require couples wishing to marry in Utah to fulfill a number of requirements before the wedding. A valid Utah marriage license must be issued to the couple. While any adult can successfully apply for a license on their own, minors face parental consent restrictions. Utah also is one of the few states that continue to recognize common law marriages. For more on the details of Utah marriage laws, see below.

 

Utah Marriage Consent Laws

  • With Parental Consent: 16 and 17 year-olds can marry in Utah only with parental consent. Minors 15 and younger must, in addition to parental consent, get court approval. A judge will only approve if the marriage is voluntary and in the “best interests” of the minor. The judge may also require premarital counseling on a case-by-case basis.
  • Without Parental Consent: Adults 18 and older may marry in Utah without parental consent.

 

Utah Common Law Marriage

The state of Utah recognizes common law marriages. Establishing a common law marriage in Utah essentially requires proof of four elements: the couple must (1) be of legal age and capable of giving consent, (2) cohabitate, (3) mutually assume the duties, rights, and obligations of a marriage, and (4) hold themselves out to the public as husband and wife.

 

Utah Marriage License

  • Residency:  No residency requirement.
  • Tests: None.
  • Identification Required: Standard photo ID such as a driver’s license or passport, and social security number must also be presented.
  • Appearance/Proxy:  Proxy marriages are not available in Utah. Both parties must be present at the time of application.
  • Previous Marriages:  Previously married individuals must provide the date that the previous marriage ended, such as the date of divorce or the date of death of the former spouse.
  • Length of License:  30 days from the time of issuance.
  • Fees:  Generally $45.
  • Copies:  Two certified copies are included in the application fee.
  • Authorized Utah Officiants:  Ordained ministers, priests, rabbis, judges, county clerks, and mayors.